Public Health Facilities / Mur Mur Lab

Public Health Facilities / Mur Mur Lab

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  • Zoned Area of ​​this architecture project Area:
    265 m²

  • Year Year of realization of this architectural project

    Year:


    2021


  • Photographs

  • Manufacturers Marks with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers: RHEINZINK, Shikoku Chemical Research, Yangming old brick
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Text description provided by the architects. Ji Gu Cang Public Health Center of Jia Ding District is a small house recently completed by Mur Mur Lab. The building is close to Jia Ding’s Lian Qi River, which was abandoned for a long time and was originally used as a water pump room. The completed building reintroduces the city’s public activities to the waterfront space and establishes it as a new center for local community activity.

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The community. The site has two impressive memories: first, it has a very good surrounding landscape, near the Lianqi River in Jiading, integrated into the green belt along the river; second, between an abandoned water pumping station and the existing public toilets, there is a small plaza, with locked iron doors, used for piles of debris. The original design did not include a pumping station or a small plaza. It was we who insisted that the owners consider them as a whole. Although used as a public toilet, it has the potential to become a place for community living, provided it is properly managed.

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“Public toilets +” is simply a new model of “public toilets + public space” that we have specially proposed for this site. To ensure both the use of public toilets and the quality of public space, the key is reasonable accommodation. We investigated some public restrooms in surrounding cities and divided them into two groups based on frequency of use and requirements for ventilation and sightlines in different areas. A group includes the management room and the men’s and women’s toilets, which have frequent access and smell. The other group includes the mother and baby room and the third gender room, which are less common but may require more privacy.

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These two function groups are arranged on either side of the square, as close as possible to the city street, leaving the event space facing the river. The entrance and exit of the men’s and women’s toilets are directly connected to the street by a barrier-free ramp, so that only residents who go to the toilet can enter and exit easily without entering the small square, and also reduce the mutual interference of smell and sight. Surrounded by the Lianqi River and plants, the abandoned square has become a relatively independent, pleasant and beautiful public activity space. Tucked away at its innermost end, an exterior steel staircase leads to an open roof room. In the future, it will serve as a miniature community showroom, faithfully recording real daily life.

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Sociality? This process of designing public buildings gives us a good starting point to look at a perennial question: can architecture be a tool for social betterment? When thinking about this question, we are often in a giant tear. Before college, like most of us, it never occurred to us that building a house had such deep meaning. In college, starting from scratch, we accept the idea of ​​convergence, and the social value of architecture seems innate and taken for granted. But after the practice, everyone is quickly trained in the real trading context. We were a bit confused for a while.

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Does the social value of architecture exist? Let’s talk about another question: does architecture have value for people? The answer is obvious. More importantly, “man” here is not an abstract reference, but a wealthy individual. A home can only serve the people you see around you every day. The social value of architecture, in the long run, is its equal value to every user. What’s the difference between an old man in the sun and a girl who wants to take a nice picture? In this sense, architecture must embody equal meanings in commercial and non-commercial scenes. Look inside, and there is a rich desert, There we saw the growth of little houses.

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